• Chantale Denis

Getting Serious About Teen Smartphone Addiction

May 24, 2017



Getting serious about teen smart phone addiction

Cell phones have changed the face of how we communicate, namely what we say, what we fail to say and how we say it. In short, cell phones may add to our world of communication as a medium in being connected to one another, but it comes at a heavy price---loss of genuine kindness and empathy often occurs without little forethought. That's why I was thrilled and honored to be asked my opinion about cell phone use from both a professional clinical and sociological perspective.


When reporter Pam Barker for ECT News Network, one of the largest e-business and technology news publishers "Technews" in the United States connected with me to ask me about my thoughts on Smartphone Addiction, I was more than happy to provide my insight and expertise in addictions. Ultimately, because I had yet to discover any scientific journal articles that addresses the significant impact of cell phone use on relationships, I had to speak up! Cell phone use has the propensity of feeding an absence of Empathy! Cell phones can so easily serve as a disenchanted tool and lack of accountability in as much as it can hold us accountable.


So, I felt exceedingly thrilled when Empathy became the forefront of the overall article and grateful that it got out there. Maybe people now with think twice before they text. At least, I would hope so.


At a very basic level, people text without thinking. I have heard countless stories of couples breaking up by text. The lack of consideration and respect for the other is actually shocking, especially when two people were in a relationship. It says more about the person who breaks up than the one on the receiving end. It's all too common.


On a more complex level, cell phone addiction can damage the very fabric of our civility. I never forget a few incidents that stand out for me. I went to a bakery. The cashier was talking on her cell while serving me; a friend was texting while we were visiting with one another; and the obvious---driving at 120km /hr veering off the road because someone is texting.


When we are not giving 100 percent of ourselves in the 'here and now' in our interactions with others, it begs the question: What's it going to be like in the next generation? or more specifically, Why do we accept these behaviours without conscience? We are lacking simple consideration for others. But, why? We seem to have accepted a new norm. How tragic.


If Germany is any indication, we have reason to worry about the depth and breathe of future relationships and how our civility is changing.


"Germany installs ground-level traffic lights for distracted cellphone users" and refers to cell phone addicted users as "Smartphone Zombies."
To read the full article, click here.


After the article was published, I was thrilled to discover that the notion I purported about the impact of lack of Empathy has among cell phone users--the article went viral.


Check it out!

MEDIA COVERAGE:

Getting Serious About Teen Smartphone Addiction

Published in Technews World, by Pam Barker

May 24, 2017

To read the full article, click here.


Here's an excerpt:

"Lack of empathy seems to be a forerunner among cellphone users," suggested Chantale Denis, a clinical social worker and sociologist.
"Whether users are addicted or not, cellphone use can perpetuate a lack of accountability, breed irresponsible behavior, feed malevolence, and retard the ability to effectively nurture social skills inherent in our civility to be kind, thoughtful, caring, loving and understanding," she [Chantale Denuis} told TechNewsWorld.

Once the article was published, it went viral appearing in the following sites:


Featured in





Ridgeway/

Fort Erie,

Ontario, Canada

355 Ridge Rd N

Ridgeway, ON,

L0S 1N0

Direct line:   289-214-1574

Clinic:          905-894-1551

Private and Confidential

Featured in

How can I help you?

Your personal information will never be sold. Use of this form does not establish a professional relationship. In case of emergency please call a medical doctor or 911.

No part of this site may be copied, reproduced or used without written permission of the author owner, Chantale Denis

Privacy policy